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 #   Notes   Linked to 
1 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Giese, J.A. (I45)
 
2 Dygvi's mother was Drâott, a daughter of King Danp, the son of Râig, who was first called konungr in the Danish tongue. His descendants always afterwards considered the title of konungr the title of highest dignity. Dygvi was the first of his family to be called konungr, for his predecessors had been called drâottinn ['chieftain'], and their wives drâottning, and their court drâott ['war band']. Each of their race was called Yngvi, or Ynguni, and the whole race together Ynglingar. Queen Drâott was a sister of King Dan Mikillati, from whom Denmark took its name. Drott (I9398)
 
3 Entered the service in the 5th Regiment of Virginia in the Revolution February. 1, 1776 under Colonel Scott, Colonel Crawford, Captain Terrell and General Mecklenburg: served 2 years, was discharged February. 1778. He was at Germantown, Monmouth and Valley Forge. He marched to Williamsburg, Norfolk and Philadelphia. It is said he was pensioned at $80 per year Hamilton, Thomas (I8443)
 
4 Localities: Rio, Columbia, Wisconsin ZIP Code: 53960 Staveness, Kenneth Jerome Sr. (I5476)
 
5 or Virginia Smallwood, Col. James (I701)
 
6 "To reward him (William, ed.) for his services, the King gave him the young Countess of Salisbury, Madame Alys, whose estate he held in wardship. She was one of the most beautiful young ladies in the land." Degrandison, Countess of Salisbury Katherine (I8956)
 
7 (Research):"Marty" was living with his paternal grandmother and step-grandfather in Waterloo, Iowa, when they moved to Seattle, Washington, in 1955. He moved in with his father and step-mother, Polly, in 1957 in Burien, WA, where he started the fifth grade . Marty was an average student through high school with interests in sports (including his father's early model stock car racing) and photography (he was president of the high school photo club).

After high school graduation in 1965 he continued his interests in photography and photo lab processing, working as a clerk at Tall's Camera Supply, as a photo lab technician at Longacres thoroughbred horse race track, and as a "copy camera oper ator" (making negatives and photo prints for offset press and art presentations) at the Boeing Company photo lab.

In 1966, during the Vietnam conflict, he volunteered for the draft and entered the Army in June. During his various leaves from the Army he searched for and found information that lead to a reunion with his younger brother and sister from whom h e had been separated as a child. After spending the majority of his 2 year tour of duty working in the photo lab at the Army Field Printing Plant, Ft. Sill, OK, he returned to Seattle and rehired with Boeing.

Marty started college in 1968 with an interest, initially, in architecture. In 1969 he quit Boeing again to attend college full time. After a few quarters his interests shifted to aerospace engineering, influenced by the Apollo lunar landing mis sions. He worked part time as a dishwasher in a restaurant to supplement his tuition support from the G.I. Bill. While at the University of Washington, Seattle, his main method of transportation was by 10-speed bicycle. He made several long trip s by bicycle from the "U" District to South Seattle to visit his father and friends, and to work.

During his undergraduate college years he was elected chairman of the student chapter of AIAA (American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics - dedicated to excellence in aerospace engineering) at the U of W, as well as elected as a life mem ber to Tau Beta Pi (a national engineering society).

After college graduation, Marty rehired with the Boeing Company in January, 1974, as a stress analyst engineer, working on the 747 SP commercial jet airplane. His responsibilities included ensuring the integrity of the structural components asso ciated with the aft fuselage tail cone (aft of the cabin), the vertical and horizontal tails, and 747 landing gear. While working at Boeing he continued grad school taking classes part time until he got his Master of Science in Aeronautics and A stronautics degree from the U of W in 1976.

In 1974 he met Rose Lorene Conover, a Seattle native, whom he married in 1976. They moved into an apartment in Northwest Seattle where they lived the first year of their marriage. In 1977 they purchased a duplex in Mountlake Terrace, WA, lived i n one side and rented out the other.

In June, 1979, Marty and Rose moved out of the duplex to a house 3 miles south and at the same time Marty was transfered to the Boeing 757 project at the other end of the city (a 26 mile commute, one way). He assumed the position of lead enginee r for the internal structural loads for the 757-200 tail cone, vertical, and horizontal tails. He remained in this position through the design, manufacturing, flight test, certification, and destruction testing of the 757.

In 1985 he transferred within Boeing to the Structures Engineering Computing Research Group to plan and implement the cost-effective use of engineering tools and methods in Structures Engineering using computers.

He remains in this lead engineer position today with additional responsibilities to coordinate automation planning and implementation, and "continuous quality improvement", reporting to the Chief Engineer of Loads, Dynamics and Computing, Boein g Commercial Airplane Group.

Both Marty and Rose do volunteer work for the Seattle Audubon Society.

Marty's other interests include photography, stained glass, computers (president of a North Seattle computer club; 1986-1988), music (as an amateur composer/guitar player/singer), and mechanical things from remodeling the house to repairing gidg ets.

... as of 1993 
Prather, Harold Martin Jr. (I7552)
 
8 (Research):... It then apparently passed in the direct male line to Sir Maurice Berkeley (d. 1460), Sir Maurice Berkeley (fn. 66) (d. 1474), and William Berkeley (fn. 67) (d. s.p. 1485). (fn. 68) William's successor was his sister Catherine (d. 1494), wh o married John Stourton, Lord Stourton (d. 1485), and Sir John Brereton. Her estate passed successively to Brereton, (fn. 69) to her daughter Werburgh Brereton (d. 1525), who married secondly Sir William Compton (d. 1528), to Compton, to Peter C ompton (d. 1544), the son of Werburgh and Sir William, (fn. 70) and to Peter's relict Anne. (fn. 71) On the death in 1588 of Anne, then the relict of William Herbert, earl of Pembroke, (fn. 72) the estate reverted to her son Henry Compton, Lor d Compton (d. 1589), (fn. 73) whose son William, Lord Compton, sold it to Thomas Aubrey in 1591. ... Brereton, Werburgh (I16153)
 
9 (Research):After a reign of 24 years Kenneth was killed in Fettercairn. According to the chronciles of John of Fordun, this was as a result of a plot mounted by Lady Finella, the daughter of the Earl of Angus. After the murder Finella fled to St Cyrus before being caught and executed. Kenneth II was buried in the graveyard at Saint Oran's Chapel on the Isle of Iona. Kenneth II was succeeded by his third cousin Constantine III, son of King Culen. King of Scotland Kenneth II (I2059)
 
10 (Research):As there is much confusion and not yet proven that William Weillum Compton and Sir William Compton are the same person. (more fact disprove this than prove it THose listed at the end.)

I am linking William Weillum and Sir William seperatly under Spencer Compton, but keeping William Weillum as disproved status so I can list all the facts and keep this straight.

There is a lot of confusion about Sir William and William Weillem and even a William born from an earlier time.

There was the "Weillum" Compton that refers to was one of the "Puritans" who spent time in Holland prior to moving to America during the English Civil War, and he would have lived 1622 - 1694. This would be the William Compton who died in Gravesend, Suffolk County, New York. This one had a son named William.

There was "Sir" William he was born in 1625, third son, of Lord Spencer Compton, Earl of Northampton whose ancestral home was Compton Wynyates in Warwickshire, England. This Sir William was knighted at the age of 19 fighting for King Charles I in 1643 and was very active in subsequent conspiracies to bring about the restoration of the Stewart family to the Crown of England, including that of the "Sealed Knot" which lasted for all of about six months; all of these after the execution of Charles I in 1649. Willaim had 2 sons named Thomas and John.

In the Book: British and American Comptons in New York, New Jersey, Virginia,Tennessee, Alabama and Texas. 1634-1984 First edition 1984. It talks about another William: ...William Compton, the builder of this castle, Compton Wyngates, was eleven years old when his father died. He became a ward of King Henry VIII, who appointed him to wait on his son, Henry, Duke of York. William Compton so igratiated himself with the Duke that his fortune was greatly enhanced by this connection.... THis William is actually born in 1482 and is upline from Earl Spencer.

Sir William born 1626 was the Governor of Banbury Castle in 1645-1646, and William Weillum was in Gravesend at the time. Sir William also died in England and is buried in England, William Weillum died in Gravesend.

New Leads:

Smalehope Bigg, of Cranbrooke in the County of Kent, clothier, 3 May, 1638, by John Bigg. Brother John Bigg, of Maidstone, to be executor. To the poor of Cranbrooke ten pounds. To my Aunt Mary Bridger of West Peckham and her two sons, Robert and Thomas Betts; to my kinswomen, the wife of William Hunt of Brenchley, Anne Bottinge of Brenchley, widow, and the wife of John Saxby of Leeds; to Judith, wife of Thomas Tadnall, late of Dover; to Godfrey Martin of Old Romney and his sisters; to the children of Robert Pell of New Romney, jurat, deceased. "To my kinsfolk Thomas Bate, of Lydd, James Bate, Clement Bate, the wife of William Batchelor, John Compton, Edward White and Martha his wife, all of which are now resident in New England, twenty shillings each. I give ten pounds to be distributed to them or to others in New England by my mother and my brother John Stow. To Peter Master of Cranbrook who married my sister. To my mother Rachel Bigg one hundred pounds. Lands &c. at Rye in County Sussex to my wife Ellin. To my sisters Patience Foster and Elizabeth Stow in New England. To Hopestill Foster, son of my sister three hundred pounds. To Thomas and John Stow, sons of my sister Stow two hundred pounds each. To Elizabeth Stow and the other three children (under age) of my sister Stow. Lands in Horsmonden to my brother John Bigg. Lands at Wittersham, Lidd and Cranbrook to Samuel Bigg, my brother's son, at the age of twenty-three years. My friends John Nowell of Rye, gentleman, James Holden and Thomas Bigg the elder, of Cranbrook, clothiers, to be overseers. To my cousin Hunt's children and John Saxbey's children; to the two sons of my Aunt Betts; to my cousin Bottenn's children; to my cousin Pell's children, viz., Joan Pell, Elizabeth Pell, Richard Pell and Thomas Baytope's wife." Mr. Waters continued, "After a hearing of the case between John Bigg, brother and executor of the one part, and Hellen alias Ellen Bigg (the relict), Patience Bigg alias Foster, wife of Richard Foster, and Elizabeth Bigg alias Stow, wife of Richard (sic) Stow, testator's sisters, of the other part, sentence was pronounced to confirm the will 4 April, 1639

Is it possable that this John Compton is Williams Father? 
Compton, William Weillum I (I272)
 
11 (Research):As there is much confusion and not yet proven that William Weillum Compton and Sir William Compton are the same person. (more fact disprove this than prove it THose listed at the end.)

I am linking William Weillum and Sir William seperatly under Spencer Compton, but keeping William Weillum as disproved status so I can list all the facts and keep this straight.

There is a lot of confusion about Sir William and William Weillem and even a William born from an earlier time.

There was the "Weillum" Compton that refers to was one of the "Puritans" who spent time in Holland prior to moving to America during the English Civil War, and he would have lived 1622 - 1694. This would be the William Compton who died in Gravesend, Suffolk County, New York. This one had a son named William.

There was "Sir" William he was born in 1625, third son, of Lord Spencer Compton, Earl of Northampton whose ancestral home was Compton Wynyates in Warwickshire, England. This Sir William was knighted at the age of 19 fighting for King Charles I in 1643 and was very active in subsequent conspiracies to bring about the restoration of the Stewart family to the Crown of England, including that of the "Sealed Knot" which lasted for all of about six months; all of these after the execution of Charles I in 1649. Willaim had 2 sons named Thomas and John.

In the Book: British and American Comptons in New York, New Jersey, Virginia,Tennessee, Alabama and Texas. 1634-1984 First edition 1984. It talks about another William: ...William Compton, the builder of this castle, Compton Wyngates, was eleven years old when his father died. He became a ward of King Henry VIII, who appointed him to wait on his son, Henry, Duke of York. William Compton so igratiated himself with the Duke that his fortune was greatly enhanced by this connection.... THis William is actually born in 1482 and is upline from Earl Spencer.

Sir William born 1626 was the Governor of Banbury Castle in 1645-1646, and William Weillum was in Gravesend at the time. Sir William also died in England and is buried in England, William Weillum died in Gravesend. 
Compton, Sir William (I4133)
 
12 (Research):Burial is 7 Months from Death, but that is how it is recorded on AFN Files Prather, William B. (I330)
 
13 (Research):Captain John Bowne, of Middletown, for his rights, 18th March, 1675, 500 acres. Item: for rights of himself and wife, his father, mother and for William Compton and his wife from first year, 120 acres each, 780 acres; three servants at 60 acres each. 180 acres.

This suggests a close link between Capt. John Bowne and William Compton; we know William Compton's wife was a Mary, so we have interpreted it as Mary being sister to Capt. John Bowne, and Bowne and Compton being brothers-in-law. 
Compton, William Henry II (I261)
 
14 (Research):Comptonology is giving the fruits of some research work on the kinship of one branch of the Compton family of America to the Abraham Lincoln's family. Capt. William Bowne, a nabob of English settlement of Long Island had among other daughters Mary and Sara. Mary Bowne and William Compton came to Monmouth Co., NJ by 1666 was one of the 12 men to help establish the Baptist Church at Middletown and the children of William and Mary were Richard md. Providence Isselstyne (Prudence Usselton) 1694 NJ, Cornelius thought to have md. -?- Stout, Jacob md. Elizabeth (last name unknown) and Judith md. Benjamin Devell 1689--possibly they had other children. Sara Bowne md. Richard Salter, moved to Monmouth Co., NJ and had these children: Thomas, John, Hanna, Richard Jr.,Wm., Ebenezer, James, Beborah and Oliver. Sara, wife of Richard Saltar, was a member of the Baptist Church at Middletown Co., NJ. There are other Saltars who must have been children of Richard and Sara Saltar. Hanna Saltar md. Mordecai Lincoln, who was born 4/24/1686 at Hingham, Mass, and came to NJ with His brother Abraham by 1708. Mordecai was son of Mordecai, Sr. and grandson of Samuel Lincoln, the emigrant from England, who came to Hingham by 1637. Samuel md. Martha, her last name is unknown, and they had eleven children.
Mordecai and Hanna Salter Lincoln's oldest son was John b. 5/3/1711, and moved with his parents and other children to Chester Co., PA by 1725. This John Lincoln in 1748 sold land in Middlesex Co., NJ which had been willed him by his father on Cranberry Creek, 300 acres to Wm. Dye for 200 lbs..
At that date John resided in Lancaster Co., PA. This John was the great grandfather of the president, Abraham Lincoln. We do not know whom this John married, but in some way, they were related to Daniel Boone, the frontiersman. Doubtless all five of John's children were born at Caernarvon Township, Lancaster Co., PA. The third son was Abraham the grandfather of the president b. 7/16/1739. In 1767 or '68 John moved to the Shenandoah Valley, near the present site of Harrisonburg, Virginia. There he was referred to as "Virginia John" to distinguish him from a cousin John living in PA. His son Abraham accompanied him to Virginia where he purchased land in 1773 and sold it in 1780, when incited by narratives of his kinsman Daniel Boone whom he followed to the wilds of KY by or before 1784, and was shot and killed by the Indians in 1784. Abraham's son, Thomas b. 1/20/1780, was the father of the president. It is of interest to know that in the progressive migration of the noted family from Hingham, Mass. through NJ, PA, Virginia, KY, IN, onto IL and the White House. Here we show the first time Abraham Lincoln speaks of his people; statement made in 1860. "I was born 2/12/1809, Harden Co., KY. My parents were both born in Virginia of undistinguished families, possibly of the second generation, I should say. My mother, who died when I was 10 years old, was a Hanks, some of whom now reside in Adams Co., IL. My paternal grandfather Abraham Lincoln came from Rockingham Co., Virginia to KY about 1781-2 where a year or so later he was killed by Indians--not in battle but by stealth when he was laboring to open a farm in the forest. His ancestors came from PA. My father, at the death of his father, was six years of age, and grew up literally without education.
My father removed to Spencer Co., IN in my 8th year and there reached our new home when the state came into the Union. It was a wild region, with many bears and other wild animals still in the woods. There were schools but no qualifications of teachers beyond 'readin', 'writen' and 'cipherin' to the 'Rule of Three'. If a straggler, supposed to know and understand Latin happened to sojourn in the neighborhood, he was looked upon as a wizard. There was nothing to excite ambition for education. Of course when I grew up I did not know much. At 21 I came to Macon Co., IL, then to New Salem where I remained a year or so as clerk in a store." (and so on in his narrative.) Then Abraham says "an effort has been made to identify my family with the Lincoln family of New England and has ended in nothing more definite than a similarity of Christian names in both families, such as Enoch, Levi, Mordecai,Solomon, Abraham and so on. It has since been proved the families are the same.
At Clarksburg, Monmouth Co., NJ there was found some years ago a small weather beaten tombstone, a marker of Mordecai and Hanna Salter Lincoln's daughter Bebora died age 3 years and 4 months. It is near the town where Mordecai and Hanna Lincoln had lived before 1711. The grave received official recognition some years ago when Miss Ida Tarbell led a motorcade of persons interested in Lincoln to the "Ye Olde Robbins Cemetery" and placed a wreath on the grave. 
Bowne, Mary (I262)
 
15 (Research):Donnchad II had three sons, Mael Coluim, Donnchad, and Dabâid (Malcolm, Duncan, and David), two notably named for the Scottish Kings. He had a fourth child, a daughter, whose name is unknown. Earl of Fife Donnchad II (I9674)
 
16 (Research):In Heimskringgla, Njord is introduced in connection with the Esir-Vanir War. When the two sides became tired of war, they came to a peace agreement and exchanged hostages. For their part, the Vanir send to the Esir their most "outstanding men"; Njord described as wealthy, and Freyr, described as his son, in exchange for the Esir's H¶nir. Additionally, the Esir send Mâimir in exchange for the wise Kvasir.

Odin appoints Njord and Freyr as priests of sacrificial offerings, and they became gods among the Esir. Freyja is introduced as a daughter of Njord, and as the priestess at the sacrifices.

Odin gave all of his temple priests dwelling places and good estates, in Njord's case being Noatâun.

Njord married a woman named Skaoi, though she would not have intercourse with him. Skaoi then marries Odin, and the two had numerous sons.

Odin dies and Njord takes over as ruler of the Swedes, and he continues the sacrifices. Njord's rule is marked with peace and many great crops, so much so that the Swedes believed that Njord held power over the crops and over the prosperity of mankind. 
Njord (I9639)
 
17 (Research):Isaac Allerton has a relatively small number of descendants compared to other Mayflower passengers, but is an ancestor to Presidents Zachary Taylor and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Allerton, Isaac (I5936)
 
18 (Research):Isabel predeceased her husband [Robert Hill], who died in 1423 leaving a son John. Fichett, Isabella (I8618)
 
19 (Research):Julian Meals(61) was born about 1581. She died on 1 Aug 1603. Parents: Christopher Meals and Elizabeth (Meals). She was married to Edward Higgins 1596-1602. From "The Doane, Emmons, Lindner, Roney, and Stout Families", by Robert Harold Lindner: "Edward Higgins, b. 7 Sept. 1545; m. 1598 Julian Meals, b. prob. Bridstone, County Hertford, England, 1582; d. Langley Parish, Stoke-hundred, Hertfordshire, England, 1 Aug. 1603. It appears that Edward Higgins was fifty-three and Julian was sixteen when they were married. In the church yard at Langley Parish, Stoke-hundred, a brass plate bears the following inscription:
'Here lies the body of Julian Higgins, wife to Edward Higgins, and dau. to Chris. and Elizabeth Meals, who lived in the Feare of God and died the Fayth of Christ, 1 Aug. Anno Dei 1603.'

'A most kind child,
A wife most mild,
A spouse and daughter deare;
Though young of age,
Modest and sage,
Behold interred here.'

Higgins Children:

Jonathon, b. 1599
Thomas, b. 1600
Julian, b. 1601
Richard, b. 1 Aug. 1603, on the day of his mother's death"

Children were: Jonathon Higgins, Thomas Higgins, Julian Higgins, *Richard Higgins. 
Meals, Elizabeth Julian (I4030)
 
20 (Research):Maud le Botiller de Verdon, who upon her marriage to John Fitzalan became the 6th Countess of Arundel, and from whom descended the Fitzalan Earls of Arundel. De Botiller, Maud (I8983)
 
21 (Research):Mayflower passenger Stephen Hopkins may have been the same Stephen Hopkins who was on board the Sea Venture, which was shipwrecked in Bermuda in 1609. The Sea Venture was part of a fleet of 9 ships under the command of Sir George Somers and Sir William Gates. Scattered by a hurricane, some of the ships made their way to Jamestown. The Sea Venture, however, was wrecked off Bermuda. The Stephen Hopkins of the Sea Venture (and possibly the Mayflower) was a minister's clerk who fomented a mutiny on the grounds that the authority of the governor ceased when the ship was wrecked. This Stephen Hopkins was sentenced to death, but pardoned, with reference made to his [unnamed] wife and children. This Stephen Hopkins spent a further two years in the English colonial settlement at Jamestown, Virginia.

In 1998 Caleb Johnson discovered records in England that disproved that Hopkins came from Wooton-under-Edge. He actually came from Hursley in Hampshire. 
Hopkins, Stephen (I1303)
 
22 (Research):Norse god who's name and character are thought to have been inspired by the observation of the natural phenomena surrounding the appearance of wildfire.

Farbauti is the jèotunn (Gaint) husband of Laufey or Nâal and the father of Loki, 
Fâarbauti (I9642)
 
23 (Research):Richard married Hexstilda of Tynedale, grand-daughter of King Donald Ban. Their son William became Earl of Buchan through marriage, and his son from a previous marriage became Earl of Menteith and Lord of Badenoch.

When King David I's line ended in 1286, the Comyns were the most powerful family in Scotland, and had claim to the empty throne on two counts. However the crown went to King John in 1292. He was the son of Devorguilla, David's great-grand-daughter, and John Balliol, founder of Balliol College in Oxford and another of Scotland's most powerful men.

When King John was deposed the Balliols left Scotland and again the most powerful man in the country was a Comyn. Devorguilla's grandson was known as 'The Red Comyn' and ruled with complete self-interest, sometimes fighting for Scotland and at other times for England. 
Comyn, Lord Of Tynedale Richard (I3590)
 
24 (Research):Sâa er nefndr Loki eșa Loptr, sonr Fâarbauta jèotuns; mâoșir hans er Laufey eșa Nâal; br”șr hans eru Žeir Bâyleistr ok Helblindi. He is called Loki or Loptr, son of the jèotunn Fâarbauti; his mother is Laufey or Nâal; his brothers they are Bâyleistr and Helblindi.

Nâal means "needle" and Laufey generally means "full of leaves" 
Laufey (I9643)
 
25 (Research):Smith had a half brother and half sister, Joseph Hancock and Thyrza Hancock, but he was the only child of the union of Edward Smith and Catherine Hancock, nee Marsh. Thomas Jones of Runcorn was no relation to Captain Smith, so far as I'm aware, but he does seem to have been a very good friend. He was the best man at Smith's wedding in 1887 and was later a witness to his will. Smith and his family were staying with the Jones when the 1901 census was taken and Smith's widow Eleanor was lodging with the Jones's in the early years of World War One.
Thomas Jones was one of five witnesses at Smith's wedding in 1887. They were Thomas Jones, Joseph Hancock (Smith's half brother), John William Pennington, Maria Annie Pennington, Mary Privett Rooker. It may be an assumption on my part that Jones was Smith's best man, but he seems the likeliest candidate.
As to Eleanor living with the Jones's. In 1903 when he witnessed Smith's will, Thomas Jones gave his address as The Nook, Runcorn, Cheshire. In 1915, Eleanor is corresponding from that address.

Smith may have had a number of aunts and uncles, though there are only two definates.Between 1807 and 1822, at least seven children were born in Hanley, whose parents were named Edward and Elizabeth Smith. The eldest of these, Edward, was baptised on 10 May 1807, while Mary Ann (or Mary Anne) is listed as being baptised twice, on either 10 or 28 May 1809. One Thomas Smith was baptised on 30 October 1814, Jane on 11 September 1816, William on 1 June 1818, and Phyllis was baptised on 16 September 1821. All of these children had been christened at St John's, the town's Anglican church the records for which were unfortunately destroyed by fire during the Potteries Riots of 1842. But the last child, George, was baptised at the Charles Street Wesleyan Chapel. His details are more complete, he was born on 28 October 1822 and baptised on 1 December 1822.
The chances are very good that this is a full list of Edward and Elizabeth Smith's children. There is supporting evidence that Edward and George, the eldest and the youngest were related, as they were both still living with their mother in 1841 when the census was taken. It's also know that Jane Smith was their sister, as Edward would be a witness at her wedding and her daughter was lodging with his family in 1861. As to the others, it's anyone's guess.
As I have said, I've no evidence myself that the Jones's and Smith's were related, though I have never gone looking for any evidence as regards that, so they may well be. I'd be interested to hear about anything you come across in this respect.
I can however, tell you a little about the Penningtons, having a copy of the 1881 census.
In 1881, William Pennington farmed 147 acres of land at Woodhead Farm in Parkside Road, Newton in Makerfield (modern day Newton-le-Willows)and employed five labourers. William Pennington was 58 and was Born in Newton in Makerfield as were his wife and children. His wife Sarah was 53, daughter Mary J Pennington was 22, son John W Pennington was 21, Sarah E Pennington (Smith's future wife) was 19 and Martha E Pennington was 12 and listed as a scholar - a schoolgirl. They had three indoor servants living with them: Ada A Burtonshaw, 17, a general servant from London; John Hall, 60, a farm servant (indoors) from nearby Winwick; and Edward Kennedy, 56, farm servant (indoors) from Dublin, Ireland.
I imagine that the Maria A Pennington listed as a witness at Smith's wedding was either a sister not listed on the census, or (more likely) John W Pennington's wife. I also know that Eleanor's father William Pennington was dead when she married Smith six years later. 
Smith, Captain Edward John (I125)
 
26 (Research):The arms later assigned by the College of Arms to Brochwel, and that can be used by his male heirs, are 'Sable, three nags' heads, erased argent' which may represent three beheaded Saxon white horses. Many later tribes and family lines in the area claim descent from Brochwel and include his arms within theirs.

The family connection with the De la Mere family and Brockwell Yscitheor is proven by our family coat-of-Arms. Example: In the lower section of our family coat-of-Arms is 3 wolf heads erased, Silver in color with the background of the shield in sable (black).

The two above Coats of Arms one taken from text about King of Powys Brochwell (from Wiki) one taken from text about the Prince of Powys, they are not the same.
One has horses one has wolves.

He maybe decendant and named after Brokwell, but the Arms are not Proof as many have stated. 
Yscitheor, Prince of Powys Brockwell (I7419)
 
27 (Research):The Battle of Flodden or Flodden Field or occasionally Battle of Branxton was fought in the county of Northumberland in northern England on 9 September 1513, between an invading Scots army under King James IV and an English army commanded by the Earl of Surrey. It ended in victory for the English army, and was the largest battle in numbers fought between the two nations. James IV was himself killed in the battle, becoming the last monarch from the British Isles to suffer such a fate. Stuart, King of Scotland James IV (I3305)
 
28 (Research):The details in this biography come from the History of Parliament, a biographical dictionary of Members of the House of Commons.

Sir William Kingston of the Blackfriars, London, and Elmore and Painswick, Glos.(by 1476-1540), Kntd. 1513. KG nom. 24 Apr, inst. 18 May 1539. Yeoman, the chamber 1497, gent. usher 1504; j.p. Glos. 1506-d.; yeoman of the guard 1509; esquire of the body 1510; sheriff, Glos. 1514-15; jt. sewer and harbinger 1514; knight of the body 1519; carver l521; steward, duchy of Lancaster, Glos. and Herefs. 20 Mar 1521-d., chief steward, south parts of the duchy and Wales 29 Sep 1525-d.; constable, Thornbury castle. Glos. 29 Jan 1522, the Tower 28 May 1524-d.; capt, of the guard 1523; commr. subsidy, Glos. 1523, 1524, tenths of spiritualities 1535; Councillor by 1533; v.-chamberlain, the Household 1536-9, comptroller 12 Mar 1539-d.

The parentage of William Kingston has not been discovered. He cannot be placed among the Kingstons of Chilney and Kingston Bagpuze, Berkshire, who owned land in Somerset and Wiltshire, nor in the family of Kingston of Wendover, Buckinghamshire, in whose early 16th-century pedigree, however, the names William and George Kingston was to mention a ăa€ä brotherăa€ÙL George in his will both occur. It is more likely that Kingston was a Gloucestershire man and that he was related to the Lords Berkeley of Berkeley Castle and Thornbury, for he had a ăa€ä cousinăa€ÙL John Berkeley for whom he wrote a letter of support in 1533. He had an early connexion with Gloucestershire, either territorially or as one of the entourage of Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham: he attended with three or four servants the Christmas celebrations at the duke's manor of Thornbury in 1507. All his local commissions from 1506 onwards also related to Gloucestershire, and in a deed of 1517 he was described as of Elmore in that county. Although he was to acquire a number of keeperships and grants of property there, he did not buy the manor of Painswick from Cromwell until May 1540.

With Henry VIII on the throne Kingston progressed in the Household, attended the principal state occasions, and served with increasing responsibility in many of the campaigns after 1512. He fought at Flodden, perhaps under Thomas Berkeley, and was engaged in the most dangerous sector of the border fighting with the 2nd Lord Dacre during 1523. He became a friend of Arthur Plantagenet, Viscount Lisle, with whom in 1510 he had a licence to export 2,000 kerseys from Southampton and London free of duty. In the reshuffle of courtiers in 1519 Kingston was one of those brought into residence. He also had a domicile at Blackfriars.

In 1521 Kingston served on the grand jury which indicted Buckingham of treason, and he was to be a principal beneficiary by the duke's fall. In the following year the King bestowed upon him the offices of steward and bailiff of Bedminster, Somerset, and all the duke's possessions in Gloucestershire; of constable of Thornbury castle and master of all the hunts in the county: his enjoyment of all these was safeguarded in the Act of attainder (14 and 15 Hen. VIII, c.20) subsequently passed against the dead Duke. To them were soon added important stewardships of duchy of Lancaster lands in the west and further promotion. As captain of the guard Kingston was sent to apprehend Wolsey in Nov 1529 and as constable of the Tower he became custodian of the series of state prisoners there. He was one of the signatories to the petition to the Pope for the King's divorce, yet in 1535 Chapuys was to observe to the Emperor that if war came and Catalina de Aragon and Princess Mary were put in the Tower, Kingston would be a good servant to your majesty and the ladies.

Kingston had been returned to the Parliament of 1529 with the Gloucestershire knight Sir John Brydges to whom he was linked by his marriage with Anne Guise. Between the fourth and fifth sessions he accompanied the King to Calais, after which journey he took an interest in the affairs of the pale. During the final session Kingston kept the deputy, Lisle, informed about the passage of the new ordinances, observing:

We of the Commons house have a good book for Calais and it has been read and will shortly pass, but at the reading there was one that would have had it committed, as the manner is, and then, if it should be committed, it be committed to some blind men, for it is far from our knowledge. Kingston's name appears on a list of Members prepared by Cromwell on the dorse of a letter of Dec 1534 and thought to contain the names of those having a particular, though undetermined, connexion with the treasons bill then before the House. About the time that Cromwell made the list, he encouraged Kingston and Sir Thomas Denys to read Bracton on the subject of the King's dominion over the Church.

By the autumn of 1536 Kingston had become one of the King's inner council, and his name constantly appears in instructions and correspondence during the northern rebellion. He played an active part by leading in person, with his own band of 500 men, a large force of Gloucestershire landowners. After presumably sitting in the Parliament of 1536, to which the King asked that the previous Members should be re-elected, Kingston appears to have been one of the more prominent Members, if not a leader, of the Commons in its successor of 1539. On nine occasions during the first two sessions he bore bills from the Lower to the Upper House. He also shared in the discussion leading to the Act of Six Articles: after Thomas Broke had spoken at length about the sacrament, Kingston taunted him, saying that if he still doubted after 12 Jul, when the Act would take effect, he should bring the matter before the Council, where he would receive an answer to every article. Speaker Hare considered that Kingston rather than Broke, who had reverently spoken his mind as was lawful, had done contrary to the order of the House.

Kingston attended his last Privy Council meeting on 1 Sep 1540 and died at Painswick 13 days later. In his short will, drawn up on 26 Jun 1539, soon after his brush with Broke, he made bequests to Sir John Dauntesey, Sir John St. Loe, Richard Cromwell alias Williams, and John and Thomas Guise, who were probably his stepsons. Apart from Painswick, he mentioned only the manors of Clopton and Rush in Berkshire. The will was proved on 5 Jul 1541 on behalf of his executors, who were his wife Mary, Sir William Fitzwilliam, Earl of Southampton, and Sir Anthony Browne. Kingston was succeeded by his son Anthony, then aged 21 and more.

from Tudor Place 
Kingston, Sir William (I7429)
 
29 (Research):The names of Thomas and Ester are not definitely known, but for various reasons such as living in the same place at the same time, enlisting in the Revolutionary War at the same place and time, and having children with the same names etc. Therefore, Thomas Hamilton/Hambleton, who deceased 1772, naming the two sons who are still living in the home in his will, and whos wife is Esther (Sampson?) and living in Bedford County, Virginia, but married in Maryland on January 30, 1753 in Hartfo rd County. (Maryland Hall of Records, St. John's Parish Register, 1700-1760 (m.1011) page 207)

According to family tradition the Hamiltons are of Scottish descent, coming first to the state of Delaware and thence to Maryland; and from there to Bedford County, Virginia and thence to Sullivan County, Tennessee before coming to Floyd Co., KY . All of this time they spelled their name Hambleton, the Scottish spelling of Hamilton. Their first deeds for land was spelled Hamilton. 
Hamilton, Thomas (I8457)
 
30 (Research):Thomas Carew was born before 1427.
He was the son of Sir Nicholas Carew and Joan Courtenay. He married Joan Carminowe, daughter of Thomas Carminowe. He died in October 1461.
Due to his failing to answer summons to military service and his never being knighted, it has been conjectured that he had poor health or was otherwise physically handicapped.
He lived at Mohun's Ottery. 
Carew, Thomas (I8587)
 
31 (Research):Two of the oldest children were from a first marriage, in Penn. and when the wife died, Bazil left these children with the maternal grandparents to raise.

This family lived in Maryland until 1778, in Iredell Co. and Rowen Co., North Carolina for 20 years (1798). He bought 3,000 acres in Clark's Grant, Indiana Territory in 1798. Part of this family moved to Clark Co., Indiana with their parents in 1801, and then some of the other children followed in 1805. Other related families making the move to Indiana around this same time were: Veatches, Hiltons, other Prathers, Redmans, Holemans,and Jacobs.
He was wounded at the battle of Camden. S. C. in 1785 and was lame the rest of his life.
Many of these family members are buried in this church cemetery located 1/2 mile N. E. of Watson, Indiana, and a lot of the tomb stones are no longer there. 
Prather, Basil William (I326)
 
32 (Research):Was a Slave Groa (I4772)
 
33 (Research):When researching this I find most people must have the same source which was wrong.

First they are showing Wife Wadham Died in 1388 but got married in 1397 (impossable)

Next I notice the death date for Wife Fichett is the same death date as Robert (unlikly)


Looking for more proof on Dates. 
Hill, Justice of the Common Pleas Robert (I8597)
 
34 (Research):When William the Conqueror came to England he had a companion named Robert of Comyn, believed to have been so named from Comines in Flanders, whom he made Earl of Northumberland in 1069. When David I came to Scotland, Robert's grandson Richard came with him, and was made Chancellor of Scotland in 1133.

The speed with which the Comyns established themselves and their power is notable. They settled in Badenoch where the clan's chiefs were known as Lords of Badenoch, ruling from the impregnable island castle in Lochindorb. 
Comyn, Earl of Northumbria Robert (I3487)
 
35 1642 Age 20 in England The original Earl of Northamptons regiment was raised in Warwickshire and Oxfordshire in 1642 by the then Earl Spencer Compton. He commanded the horse troop of the regiment, which fought with the Oxford field army, until his death in action when he was succeeded by his son James. The horse are known to have fought in a number of the major battles of the Civil Wars including Hopton Heath, Newbury, Cropredy Bridge and Naseby. The foot part of the regiment was comanded by Spencer Compton's son William and was the Garrison at Banbury for most of the war. They also seem to have fought at the battles at Leicester and Middleton Cheney. Compton, Sir William (I4133)
 
36 1861 Scotland Compton, Lucy Ann (I231)
 
37 1869 Compton, Daniel Donald (I322)
 
38 1890 Veatch, Benjamin Harrison (I6170)
 
39 19 JUL Campbell, Evelyn Florence (I6219)
 
40 2 Dec Conover, Charles Norman (I7568)
 
41 25 APR Simpson, Kate (I6299)
 
42 25 JUL Family F3409
 
43 3 Children Family F99
 
44 31 JUL Campbell, Evelyn Florence (I6219)
 
45 45 Great Grandfather in one line and 46 Great Grandfather in another. King of Alclud Ceretic Wledig (I4457)
 
46 45 Great Grandfather one line and 44 Great Grandfather on another King of Strathclyde Erbin (I4587)
 
47 4th Child Veatch, James Jr. (I473)
 
48 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Jordan, D.A. (I2)
 
49 7 MAR Priest, Mary (I5963)
 
50 9189 Williams Place, Frisco, Texas 75034

Gary c/o Prather Enterprises P. O. Box 1225, Sulphur, Okla. 73086 
Source (S6)
 

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